Chinese American Artist Featured At Sterling Oaks

Shaolin Monkey

Award-winning Chinese American artist Tiffany Chang is being featured this month in the Sterling Oaks clubhouse in Naples Florida. Her art encompasses a variety of different bodies of work and includes a collection of oil paintings based on the animals of the Chinese zodiac.  Two of these animals, the Shaolin Monkey and the Tai Chi Rabbit will be on display during the Sterling Oaks exhibition.  Selections from her Garden collection will also be on display including a series of large oil paintings of exotic flowers found in Naples.  Using her unique style she has dramatized these flowers to maximize their impact to the viewer.  Her entire garden collection can be seen on her website www.tiffanychang.us.

Artist Tiffany Chang was born in Shanghai, China and raised in Taipei, Taiwan where she started her training as an artist at the age of 10. She now lives in Naples, Florida during the winter months.  She initially trained in Chinese calligraphy and brush painting.  In her early 20’s she transitioned to western art while she studied oil painting.  She has a bachelor’s degree from the University of California and a master’s degree from the University of Connecticut.

Artwork © Tiffany Chang.  All Rights Reserved

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The Red Fire Rooster and the Goat

8 Cartoon Young Young Final-Ss

The goat was complaining to the Red Fire Rooster that things are tough and seem to be getting worse. Because he was an excellent musician the animals in the barnyard brought him food to hear his music.  He prospered for many years by sitting in front of the barn playing his delightful tunes.  Now, he complained, very few animals seemed interested.

10 Cartoon Ge Ge Final-Ss

The Red Fire Rooster was a pottery maker and told a different story. He had lived through many ups and downs in the pottery business.  Sometimes, it seemed, everybody was buying pottery.  Other times he had to travel to many different barnyards to find animals interested in his wares.  He told the goat you have to find opportunity because opportunity won’t find you.

The goat spent every day sitting in front of the barn playing his music hoping others would bring him food like they always had. He continued to complain that things are tough and seem to be getting worse.  The Red Fire Rooster was happy and full of food.  He told the goat that he always has food but sometimes he has to work really hard to get it.

Story by ZuZuthePig. All Rights Reserved

Artwork by Tiffany Chang, All Rights Reservedwww.tiffanychang.us

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Zodiacals™ Artist Profiled in New Book on Creativity

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The new book The Two Sides of You by Elaine Breakstone probes the bi-hemispheric world of creative people who move easily from left brain to right brain thinking.  The book shows how famous creative thinkers like Michelangelo and Leonardo da Vinci used both sides of their brains.  Leonardo da Vinci, for example was a genius in engineering, mathematics and medicine yet also painted the Mona Lisa and The Last Supper. Michelangelo used the left side of his brain as an architect and the right side of his brain to paint the frescoes on the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel and create the David and Pieta statues.

Chinese American artist Tiffany Chang is profiled in the book because she was trained as a mathematician at the University of California, Los Angeles, in finance by receiving an MBA degree from the University of Connecticut and as an accomplished aviator. While all of this required the use of the left side of her brain, she used the right side of her brain to become an award-winning artist with oil paintings displayed in museums, art shows and private homes in the Orient as well as in the United States.  She is also the creator of Zodiacals animal characters which are featured on a broad line of clothing and other product sold as birthday gifts (see www.zodiacals.com). The book is available on Amazon.com (http://tinyurl.com/jesbnvl) in paperback for $8.99.

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Clothing Based On Your Chinese Zodiac Birth Year

Zodiacals' Advertising II

This is a sponsored post written by me on behalf of Zodiacals.com. All opinions are 100% mine.

The Chinese zodiac has always been a very important part of the Asian culture and often provides insight into a person’s personality. A new clothing series featuring the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac is now on sale at the online store Zodiacals.com. The collections include flare dresses, flare skirts, kimono robes and silk scarves.  There is also a collection of pillows.  There are 12 items in each collection, one for each of the 12 Chinese zodiac animals.  The images were created based on oil paintings by award-winning Chinese American artist Tiffany Chang.

The Chinese zodiac became popular in the Tang Dynasty although evidence from artifacts show it dates all the way back to 475 B.C. In the beginning the Chinese zodiac was used as a convenient way to count the years and keep track of one’s age.  Eventually the 12 animals were linked to the year of a person’s birth and were found to reveal his or her character.  The Zodiacals.com collection includes clothing and pillows that display the personalities of those born in the years of the Rat, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Ox, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, and Pig. You can see all of these at www.zodiacals.com

Oil Painting Displays Personality of Year of the Ox

Chang-2, 2/1/16, 10:56 AM, 8C, 7136x9383 (795+1439), 108%, Repro 2.2 v2, 1/25 s, R87.2, G80.2, B84.2

The oil painting by Chinese American artist Tiffany Chang, “The Painter” clearly displays the personality of those born during the Year of the Ox. The personality of the Ox is diligent, reliable, honest, determined and ambitious.  The Ox in Tiffany Chang’s painting is an ambitious and determined artist with paint all over his clothing because of the large volume of paintings he has worked on.  Those born in the Year of the Ox are known for achieving their goals by having great patience.  This is demonstrated by the intricate works displayed within this oil painting that were created by the Ox.  People born in the Year of the Ox are also known for achieving their goals by consistent efforts and are not distracted by others or the environment.  This is shown by the proud stance of the Ox in this painting.

“The Painter” is on display at the von Liebig Art Center in Naples, Florida through the weekend of April 17. After that it will go on tour in art galleries in New York and in New England.  “The Painter” is part of a series of oil paintings by Tiffany Chang representing each of the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac.  The collection includes paintings that display the personalities of those born in the years of the Rat, Tiger, Rabbit, Dragon, Snake, Horse, Goat, Monkey, Rooster, Dog, and Pig. The artist has also created a line of pillows and clothing based on her Chinese zodiac animals.  You can see these at: www.Zodiacals.com.

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Happy Easter Asian Style

Chang-02, 3/1/16, 2:09 PM, 8C, 7396x9767 (401+398), 108%, Repro 2.2 v2, 1/25 s, R87.2, G80.2, B84.2

Although Easter is not as broadly celebrated in Asia as in western countries a growing number of non-Christians in Asia are starting to join in the celebration. Of course, Christians all over the world typically celebrate Easter in the traditional manner. Many non-Christians, however, are also participating for the fun and novelty. This does differ from one Asian country to another.  Outside of churches Easter is a relatively minor event in Japan and in South Korea.  In China, however, you can find malls having special Easter sales and some non-Christians making Easter eggs to sell.  People in Hong Kong celebrate Easter more avidly than those in mainland China, partly because of their English traditions.

In the west, the rabbit in this article would generally be seen as an Easter bunny. In Asia, however, many people would see it as representing the year of the rabbit.  This rabbit is actually an oil painting by award-winning Chinese American artist Tiffany Chang.  This painting, along with paintings of the other animals of the Chinese zodiac, will be going on tour this year in art galleries throughout the United States.  The artist has also created a line of pillows and clothing based on her Chinese zodiac animals.  You can see these at: www.Zodiacals.com.

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The Delight of Proper Peking Duck

Chang, 12/23/15, 9:42 AM, 8C, 8112x10687 (1706+1074), 133%, Repro 2.2 v2, 1/20 s, R87.2, G80.2, B84.2

I love to eat Peking duck, but only if it is properly prepared. All Peking duck is not the same and getting a decent version can be difficult whether this is in a restaurant or in your own home.  I have been in giant restaurants in Beijing that advertise Peking duck but serve a poor version that has non-crispy skin and very little meat.  These are restaurants that mostly cater to large busloads of tourists.  On the other hand I have also been in restaurants in Beijing where I will never forget my Peking duck experience.  The golden brown, crisp and deeply flavored skin crackled with the slightest touch of my teeth.  The meat was moist, tender and flavorful and the whole thing was wrapped in ultra-thin pancakes with scallions, cucumbers and a smear of Hoisin sauce.  What a delight.

You can prepare proper Peking duck at home but it is not a simple afternoon project. Be prepared to spend many hours, and several days. On the first day you wash and dry the duck, use a needle to poke holes in the duck to release the fat and then hang the duck overnight to dry. On the second day soak the duck in boiling water with honey, ginger and scallions and then hang it again overnight to dry.  On the third day roast the duck, remove the crisp skin and then thinly slice the duck meat.  I agree that this is a major chore but the result can be well worth the effort.  I have never seen a guest or family member that doesn’t appreciate properly prepared Peking duck.  You can see a good recipe for Peking duck at http://www.food.com/recipe/peking-duck-1

Artwork by Tiffany Chang. The artist has also created a line of pillows and clothing based on her Chinese zodiac animals.  You can see these at: www.Zodiacals.com.

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Asian American Artists Illustrate Their Identity

The Rebel II

As with the work of many Asian American artists, Tiffany Chang’s oil painting “The Rebel provides a small glimpse into what it is like being an Asian American.  Her dramatic painting, which was featured this week on the cover of the Naples Spotlight magazine, illustrates a contrarian that is part of the flock, but not necessarily going in the same direction.

Many other Asian American artists have also completed works that illustrate how they feel as an Asian American. Zhang Chun Hong, a Chinese-born artist living and working in the U.S. uses charcoal images of long straight hair in paintings to examine her identity as an Asian American woman.  And Tam Tran, who moved from South Vietnam with her family to Memphis also explores her identity in a series of self-portrait photographs called Accents.  Roger Shimomura, a third-generation Japanese American artist has created a series of paintings born out of his experience of being relocated with his family to an internment camp during World War II.

Born in Shanghai, China and raised in Taipei, Taiwan, award-winning artist Tiffany Chang moved to the United States with her family in her late teens. She completed her college education at UCLA for her undergraduate work and at the University of Connecticut for her Master’s degree.  In addition to “The Rebel”, she has created an entire collection of imaginary birds.  Her recent awards include the Bold and Spontaneous Award for her oil painting “Eagle Brute Force” at the von Leibig Art Center in Naples, Florida and an award for Technical Achievement for “The New Naples” presented by the Naples Art Association.

The artist has also created a line of pillows and clothing based on her Chinese zodiac animals.  You can see these at: www.Zodiacals.com.

Tips for those born in the Year of the Rat

Tsu Tsu the Rat -copyright S

2016 is the year of the Fire Monkey and may have a profound effect on those born in the Year of the Rat. First, the Fire Monkey sign is on very good terms with those born in the Year of the Rat and should bring them exciting powerful opportunities this year.  In 2016 Rat people should enjoy good health.  2016 should also bring better quality energy to the relationships of Rat people, including romantic relationships.  2016 promises exciting and ever unfolding career opportunities, promises of travel and better quality relationships for the Rat Chinese zodiac sign people.  High energy, less hesitation and more planning are the keywords in 2016 for the Rat sign.  See: http://fengshui.about.com/od/fengshuigoodluckcures/ss/Feng-Shui-Tips-Chinese-Zodiac-Sign-Rat.htm#step2

The above oil painting “Tsu Tsu the Rat” is part of a series of oil paintings featuring the 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac by award-winning Chinese American artist Tiffany Chang. Each of her paintings display humanized animals that illustrate the unique characteristics of each of the 12 animals of the Chinese zodiac.  Her “Tsu Tsu the Rat” painting, for example, illustrates a humanized rat carrying fruit to market.  One of the main attributes associated with the Chinese zodiac rat is wisdom and you can see this on the face of this rat.  All 12 paintings of the 12 animals of the Chinese Zodiac will be on display in art galleries in the Northeast this summer. The artist has also created a line of pillows and clothing based on her Chinese zodiac animals.  You can see these at: www.Zodiacals.com.